Drawings

When I draw, it mostly results in portraits: of individuals, objects, psychological states, the situation between people. Ink or pencil, sometimes based on code abstractions I programmed before. Monochrome.

What happens when your surface and thoughts collide?

Installation View, Christian Bazant-Hegemark, unttld contemporary Vienna, 2019
Old Man, 2019; ink on paper
150 × 150 cm | 59 × 59 in
Man, 2019; ink on paper
150 × 150 cm | 59 × 59 in
Waiting Man, 2019; ink on paper
166 × 150 cm | 65 × 59 in
Son, 2019; ink on paper
150 × 150 cm | 59 × 59 in
Old Woman, 2019; ink on paper
150 × 150 cm | 59 × 59 in
Another Old Man, 2019; ink on paper
150 × 150 cm | 59 × 59 in

In her last couple of weeks, when my mother’s mind seemed to be floating off somewhere else most of the time, she would sometimes lift her arms into the air, plucking at invisible objects with her fingers. Once, I captured her hands in mine and asked what she’d been doing. ‘Putting things away,’ she answered, smiling dreamily.

Jennie Dear, What It Feels Like To Die

Zimmermann, 2019; ink on paper
70 × 100 cm | 28 × 39 in
Typewriter, 2019; ink on paper
70 × 100 cm | 28 × 39 in
Trans, 2015 | pencil on paper
200 × 150 cm (78 × 59 in)
Mind and Body, 2015 | pencil on paper
200 × 150 cm (78 × 59 in)

The fact remains that getting people right is not what living is all about anyway. It’s getting them wrong that is living, getting them wrong and wrong and wrong and then, on careful reconsideration, getting them wrong again. That’s how we know we’re alive: we’re wrong. Maybe the best thing would be to forget being right or wrong about people and just go along for the ride. But if you can do that — well, lucky you.

Philip Roth

Zug, 2010 | pencil on paper
42 × 42 cm (16 × 16 in)
Female Portrait, 2009 | pencil on paper
42 × 29 cm (16 × 11 in)